Thematic Areas

Piracy and Armed Robbery at Sea

Global responses to piracy off the coast of Somalia have led to significant development in both international and domestic law on piracy. In sum, this has led to what is now known as the law approach to piracy – investigation, building of evidence and prosecution. This component of anti-piracy measures is still ongoing in the Indian Ocean and part of the scope of research and review of CEMLAWS.

Significantly, however, the Gulf of Guinea presents a cobweb of jurisdictional issues and challenges that the Somali experience does not answer. CEMLAWS unique understanding of the anatomy of Gulf of Guinea Piracy and the corresponding legal challenges is vital to building effective global, regional and national law enforcement approach to piracy in the Gulf of Guinea context.

Sustainable Fisheries

While it is common to only focus on IUU Fishing (Illegal Unreported Unregulated fishing), CEMLAWS looks at broader governance, economic and political dynamics that impact on sustainable fisheries in Africa. We believe that it is within this broader scoping that IUU Fishing which is estimated to be causing Africa billions of dollars in loses can be effectively addressed.

While it is common to only focus on IUU Fishing (Illegal Unreported Unregulated fishing), CEMLAWS looks at broader governance, economic and political dynamics that impact on sustainable fisheries in Africa. We believe that it is within this broader scoping that IUU Fishing which is estimated to be causing Africa billions of dollars in loses can be effectively addressed.

Offshore Infrastructure: Implications for Maritime Safety and Security

The budding offshore oil industry of the Gulf of Guinea is critical to global energy security. Offshore Gulf of Guinea has brought not only added reserves and quality of supplies but also logistical and transportation advantages. However, these positive elements are being challenged by the increasing security threats and instability in the region. CEMLAWS work in energy security is anchored on the understanding that maritime security is a continuum of the land through the sea front into the oceans. Thus, what we do in the area of energy security is analyzing and defining threat indicators as well as appropriate responses in the land-sea spectrum.

Transnational Organised Crime (TOC)

A thorough examination of TOC requires the use of broad-based analytical lenses, especially since there are several interlinkages between TOC and a number of other ocean governance/maritime security threats. CEMLAWS Africa’s work in the area involves an exploration of the varying elements of TOC at sea, and how the interplay of these elements ultimately impact differing facets of maritime security, especially in the Gulf of Guinea.

Thank you for taking the first step to support ocean governance and maritime security in Africa. To donate to a campaign or partner with us, kindly contact us on (00233) 557340502 or info@cemlawsafrica.com. Our team will be happy to share further details of the Centre’s work with you and discuss how best you can render your support.

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